A few nifty gadgets that are great to have on a shoot.

A few nifty gadgets that are great to have on a shoot.

How far is it to that wall? Is that socket HOT? Is it wired right? Is that extension HOT? Before I plug in a camera, computer or high end strobes I like to check the wall circuit. My three pronged buddy tells me just that, and if not it tells me what’s wrong so I can tell building maintenance. My Fluke buddy tells me if that extension cord is “Hot” without walking back to find out it got pulled from the wall. The laser measure is used for keeping notes on big sets how far things are from each other as well as the camera from the subject. Helpful if you are working on a project where things need to be reset many times over. In total, I think I have about one hundred dollars here and they have saved my electrical connections many a time. As much as a new camera is these days, cheap safety.

Rangefinder, and two electricity testers

Shooting an artist’s portrait with the FourSquare

Shooting an artist’s portrait with the FourSquare

For something that needs to be quick and easy …. a press release photo for a friend announcing his sculpture opening was a easy thing to do with the FourSquare. We were in a dim room with light streaming in from a south window. We set up a FourSquare with SB900’s and used a SU800 commander to trigger the strobes. It was a “blend” of available light (daylight), tungsten (spots that were on the wall behind me) and the strobes. We took a control exposure with a gray card and then batched them all to look the same. We arrived at the gallery around noon and were packing back up at 12:20. Twenty minutes to get a PR photo, in and out. Used a D700 in manual and checked by chimping on the LCD. One hour later everything was up and his email blast was done and the final image was sent to the printer for the postcard printing. You can check out more of Errol Beauchamps sculpture work at beauchampsculpture.com